Internet of Things (IoT): Three Outlooks and Data Overviews

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The Internet of Things (IoT) has become on of the most discussed topics in the digital landscape these days. Based on sensors, mechanisms, processes, the cloud and big data sets, companies as well as people try try to rethink how we can better use the Internet for our homes, our cities and the daily business.

We have collected the three most impressive pieces of content that came up lately to give you an overview of the potential and the challenges involved when using IoT.

1. IoT and legislation
A recent post by Cyberlex is discussing in details the approach of the European Union with their „Alliance for Internet of Things Innovation“ (AIOTI) and Digital Agenda for Europe on IoT against the American Federal Trade Commission with their Staff Report on the Internet of Things in order to deriver some logic for a Canadian IoT approach.

While the European guideline makes clear that the future regulations will lie on security, privacy, consumer protection, functioning competition and choice. The American discusses the issues of privacy, security and is trying to give guidance whether legislation is required to regulate the Internet of Things.

2. IoT and Social Media
Over at WT Vox a post is discussing the opportunities and the challenges that the combination of the IoT with social media generates. Although we might be seeing the power of commerce data to understand the mindset of the next customer, there might be more business impact on the image, machine and health data for our future lives when it comes to the value of IoT. However, they make clear that the all deciding question on the future of IoT will be how everybody is handling their „digital persona“ over the next years and whether we open up or step back from giving out personal data to people and companies we have got no idea what, how and why they derive data via smart health, smart home technology or smart city.

Gartner sees a more and more connected world and predicts there will more than 6.4 billion connected devices by the end of 2016. Cisco goes even further and forecasts that by 2020 even 37 billion connected devices will be in the world. McKinsey even estimates that IoT is expected to have an economic impact of $3.9 trillion to $11.1 trillion per year by 2025 (representing up to 11% of the world’s economy).

3. IoT and Investments
The infographic that delivers data by Venture Scanner that we came across via the guys at Appcessories gives some good impression of how much investment goes into the IoT development and in which industry sector most most investments and innovations are produced.

Appcessoires-Venture Scanner State-of-IoT-infographic 2015

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In all of those posts it becomes clear that there is a demand for companies to enable and ensure processes that make people aware of how they use data and technology to understand the consumers development and movement. Furthermore, it is wanted to see a continuous progress in monitoring and improving peoples‘ privacy and security. And finally, the question is whether companies and regulation units need to give clearer guidance and legal advice on compliance and data collecting and processing laws in order not to loose the trust of customers and consumers.

Forecasting the Internet of Things and IoT start-ups to watch

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The forecasts sound almost incredible. Gartner estimates that Internet of Things (IoT) products and services suppling companies will generate incremental revenue of over $300 billion by 2020.

The analyst company IDC sees the worldwide market for IoT solutions to grow from $1.9 trillion in 2013 to $7.1 trillion in 2020.

Brands like the electric company GE predict the Industrial 4.0″ will add somewhat between $10 to $15 trillion to the overall global GDP over the coming 20 years.

Samsung will invest more than $100 million for IoT startups that will help the technology manufacturer establish new ecosystem for connected devices.

The Internet of Things is at an all-time high until today. Companies want to connect consumer devices, appliances, and services in order to connect their services with devices and then generate some smart data to leverage their value chain.

Interestingly enough Google owns some of the most promising IoT companies (Nest and Dropcam) already which will make some people look sceptic how the search giant will move more and more into their lives.

Smart devices are definitely the big trend for 2015. Whether it will be Jawbone though. After testing the wristband and it’s usability, I am not quite sure if this will be the way into the future. The car industry seems to be catching up though with their smart watches replacing keys and other driver necessities.

Even the whisky industry works with smart bottles now telling us how old the whisky really is, according to Venturebeat.

The guys at WRIKE just recently pulled together the 11 most ambitious IoT start-up companies should have an eye on. Furthermore, they added to their infographic three established brands which they think will have their big breakthrough in 2015.

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How mobility will change the future workplace

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When I am commuting to work in the morning, I can see more and more people checking their emails on notebooks at the train station, working on tablets on the train, or simply participating in conference calls in the business lounge at the airport. Furthermore, many coffee houses have realized the potential of giving away free WIFI hours with a coffee break. It enables the future workplace „anytime, anywhere, any place“ – the new claim for modern business around the world.

Questions arise like: How much office space do we need in the future? Do we have to sit in our cubicles all day long? AND: How much time do we need to spend together in the office?Gartner published some data showing that 45% of workers in the US spend eight hours a week outside the office and away from their desks. And International Data Corporation (IDC) claims that there will be 1.3 billion mobile worker in approximately two years time (2015), making up 37.2% of the US workforce.

The main benefits of the future mobile workforce were illustrated in the following infographic by Cisco.
a) Reduced road travel by 91 billions miles per year.
b) Prevention of traffic injuries and deaths by 77,000.
c) Reduced greenhouse gases by 51 million tons per year.
d) Saved 281 million barrels of oil per year.
e) Gain almost 2 weeks of extra free time per year.

PS: As this infographic is interactive (and could be cut out larger), you might not see everything. Here is the link to the animated side.

The Anywhere Office

Study: More than half of consumers globally trust driverless cars

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It is one of those iRobot myths coming true probably sooner than we are thinking: Driverless cars. Today, Cisco launched some study results which stated that 57% of respondents got no issues in trusting driverless cars to take over driving control for them. However, not all countries are alike…

The study shows that emerging markets are far more open than others. In Brazil (95%), India (86%) and China (70%) of responding drivers would leave control to technology; Japan (28%) and Germany (37%) coming in at the end of the field. Furthermore, 46% of respondents said they would let their kids in driverless cars.

Apart from that 74% of respondents have no problems if cars were tracking their driving habits as long as they could save on insurance and maintenance cost. For a better driving experience 65% of drivers would also be open to share driving habits, height, weight and entertainment preferences with the car manufacturers, 60% even biometrics data. A clear sign that the driving experience can be improved by the manufacturers, and that clients are longing for it.

Car Buying Experience Goes Digital

The most interesting fact of the study was for me that buyers are becoming more open to leave the car dealer out of the purchase process. It clearly shows that the Mad Men sales process is gone. It gets replaced by interactive kiosks at the car dealer’s place people would want, as long as there is someone you can ask when you got problems with the machines. Even better, 55% would even go through the purchasing process via video chats and digital virtual sessions. Obviously again not in countries like Germany and Japan which are not very open to virtual purchasing processes.

Car Buying Experience Goes Digital II

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The Cisco study makes clear that the difference in connected car is in the service, not in having Cisco’s latest router. In the end, the next generation of cars should lie in seamless car driving experience that supports car services that help drivers find the right restaurant for their hunger, the appropriate pitstop for their needs, or the next service station before you realize you need it when driving your car.